Archivos de etiquetas: cannabis

Hemp Derived CBD vs. Cannabis Derived CBD

Where’s the Difference?

CBD Cannabis y CBD cañamo

Even though most people who experience the cannabis high produced by THC find it to be pleasant and stimulating, for some reason medicine that makes you feel good while getting you well is frowned upon. Enter cannabidiol, commonly referred to as CBD, as a way to obtain the medicinal benefits of cannabis without the THC psychoactive effects making CBD an acceptable gateway drug to the world of cannabis.

CBD is a powerful cannabinoid with research showing it to be effective in reducing cancer cell growth, minimizing seizures and convulsions in children, decreasing inflammation, mitigating pain and providing therapeutic relief for many other ailments. This newfound interest in CBD has led to an explosion of CBD oils made from industrial hemp.

In terms of its molecular structure CBD is CBD is CBD—it’s the same molecule whether the CBD comes from hemp, cannabis or a test tube. Hemp generally has a CBD concentration around 3.5 percent CBD which is pretty low but the concentration of THC is even lower, usually less than 1 percent.  Hemp meets the criteria of being low in THC, but its level of CBD is relatively low especially in comparison to certain cannabis strains, which have significantly higher amount of CBD than industrial hemp.

Whether the CBD comes from hemp or cannabis flowers is not the ultimate factor. The key factor is the process by which the CBD is extracted, concentrated and formulated. Cannabis strains such as Charlotte’s Web, Avidekel and ACDC are low in THC but high in CBD with up to a 20 percent CBD concentration level. By comparison, hemp’s typical 3.5 percent CBD concentration level is rather paltry.

Since the concentration of CBD is low in hemp, it requires large amounts of hemp to produce a small amount of CBD oil. The most efficient and least expensive way to extract the CBD oil is to use solvents, but dangerous solvent residues can remain in the CBD oil. In 2014, Project CBD, a California-based nonprofit dedicated to promoting and publicizing research into the medical uses of CBD, tested several CBD hemp oil products available to the public over the Internet and found significant levels of toxic solvent residues in random samples.

CBD oil extracted from industrial hemp is a thick tar-like substance that needs to be thinned with a compound such as propylene glycol. A widespread additive found in CBD vape oil cartridges, propylene glycol may convert to formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, when heated and inhaled.

Hexane, a solvent frequently used to extract CBDs from hemp, has been found by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to be neurotoxic producing numbness in the extremities, muscular weakness, blurred vision, headache and fatigue, according to a official statement by the EPA.

Even if it is possible to produce solvent-free CBD oil from hemp, there is another problem in that industrial hemp is a bio-accumulator that naturally absorbs toxic substances from the soil. Hemp is such an efficient bio-accumulator that it was used at the Chernobyl Nuclear power plant after the meltdown because it is excellent at sucking up heavy metals and radiation, according to McGraw Hill Education. Great for healing the earth, but not for healing humans.

CBD derivado cannabis y cañamo

“The whole effort to harness CBD from industrial hemp is fraught with challenges that are made more difficult by the fact that fiber hemp plants with high amounts of CBD by dry weight—like the ACDC cannabis strain—are not yet available for industrial grows.”

 

Martin Lee, co-founder and Director of Project CBD, summarizes the problems of obtaining CBD from hemp. “The whole effort to harness CBD from industrial hemp is fraught with challenges that are made more difficult by the fact that fiber hemp plants with high amounts of CBD by dry weight—like the ACDC cannabis strain—are not yet available for industrial grows.”

There are other considerations as well. One of the most important is that CBD by itself does not work as well as CBD in conjunction with THC. In what is known as the entourage effect, the medical efficacy of CBD is enhanced in the presence of THC. The proper ratio of CBD to THC varies from person to person, but as Martin Lee points out “the best ratio of THC to CBD is often the most THC a person can comfortably handle.”

The bottom line is since hemp is so low in THC and other cannabis components, you don’t get much of an entourage effect when you use hemp oil as when you are using oil derived from a CBD-rich cannabis plant.

If certain cannabis flowers are so much better for producing CBD, then why all this fuss over industrial hemp? Rather than anything to do with medical science, it has everything to do with the illegal status of cannabis.

The manufacturers of CBD oil from hemp claim that it is legal to market their products as a dietary supplement even though the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has refused to recognize hemp-derived CBD oil as a dietary supplement. The FDA singled out for criticism CBD oil producers for making unsubstantiated medical claims about treating pain, spasms, cancer and other ailments. The FDA has never approved CBD as a supplement for any kind of medical use.

Under current state medical marijuana laws, the only way a CBD-infused oil product—derived from hemp or cannabis—can be used legally for therapeutic purposes would be for it to be grown, harvested, processed and consumed by a certified patient in a state that has legalized medical cannabis. That is not the case with products made from CBD hemp oil imported from abroad which remain illegal under both federal and state laws.

For many reasons, CBD-rich cannabis is a better source of CBD than industrial hemp. The only reason CBD derived from hemp is gaining any notoriety is as an attempted end-run around federal law. When cannabis prohibition is ended and cannabis is treated like any other agricultural product, CBD will be extracted from the best source of cannabidiol—CBD-rich cannabis. The need to derive CBD from industrial hemp will end.

Source: ireadculture

Salvados Asociación os desea Feliz Año 2016

feliz 2016

Can Marijuana Help with Depression?

cannabis-depression-salvados asociacion

Medical research suggests that cannabis may help improve mood, but users also seem to suffer higher rates of depression.

Marijuana is sometimes referred to as ‘green Prozac’ due to the fact that many users find it helpful in lifting their spirits. But can it actually be an effective treatment for depression?

Interestingly, the idea that cannabis can be used to improve mood goes back hundreds of years. And many people today still agree.

“A lot of people report using cannabis effectively to treat depression,” says Zachary Walsh, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia who heads a research lab focused on marijuana and mental health.

But whether cannabis has actually been proven to help with depression can’t be answered with a simple yes or no. The answer is more complicated because there are different types of depression, explains Walsh.

Generally speaking, depression is defined as the feeling of sadness or hopelessness over an extended period of time.

Studies on Marijuana and Depression

For depression that is caused by chronic stress, components of marijuana may be an effective treatment, according to a 2015 study by University of Buffalo scientists. The findings showed that stress caused a decrease in cannabis-like molecules naturally found in the brain, leading to behavior that mimicked depression.

Another study published in 2007 by a team at McGill University showed that administering low doses of THC could work like an antidepressant by increasing serotonin. However, in high dosages, THC decreased serotonin and seemed to worsen depression.

“These findings confirm what has been reported by people who smoke cannabis,” explains Dr. Gabriella Gobbi, who co-authored the McGill study. “Often it produces euphoria, calmness, sociability, but in other circumstances it can produce bad dreams and negative feelings.”

Overall there hasn’t been enough research in the field, Dr. Gobbi says, adding that the type of research needed to confirm whether marijuana can effectively treat depression is quite complex.

“Not only do we have to determine the dose-effect of cannabis on depressive people, but also which kind of cannabinoid may have a positive effect on mood.”

Cannabinoids are a class of molecules found in cannabis, which include THC and CBD. Over 60 different cannabinoids have been identified in marijuana, making it difficult to determine the drug’s overall effect on depression.

Higher Rates of Depression

While medical literature suggests that cannabis can improve mood, studies involving recreational users often show that people who use cannabis are more depressed, says Walsh.

“What those studies have noted is that they can’t really determine what comes first,” he explains. In other words: “Does cannabis cause depression? Do depressed people try to use cannabis to help with depression? Those are questions that are out there.”

An important factor in the answer could be the age of the person consuming cannabis.

According to research conducted by Dr. Gobbi in 2009, daily use of marijuana can cause depression and anxiety in teens.

“Cannabis, when consumed by adolescents, induces depression and anxiety later in adulthood, even if the people did not have any susceptibility for these mental diseases,” she says.

Cannabis vs. Antidepressants

While researchers can’t completely confirm if marijuana is effective for treating depression, Walsh points out that other medicines fall into the same problem.

He says that in some cases, typical antidepressants are no more effective than a placebo and have side effects that may be more severe than those of marijuana.

Dr. Gobbi explains that in order to declare a drug effective for a certain disease, it must go through different stages of clinical trials, which marijuana has not.

“If we want to take a rational approach about medicinal cannabis, we should go through systematic clinical studies and finally determine its efficacy in treating specific diseases and its safety compared to standard antidepressants,” she says.

Walsh agrees that further research should compare cannabis to commonly used antidepressants. “Then I think people can make the choice,” he concludes.

 

Source: Leafscience

CBD Holds Promise as Child Epilepsy Treatment, Studies Find

Behind strain names like Charlotte’s Web and Haleigh’s Hope are stories of children whose epileptic seizures were dramatically reduced through medical cannabis. But while evidence so far has been anecdotal, doctors this week are presenting the first scientific studies to back them up.

Cannabidiol_CBD_Epilepsy

At the American Epilepsy Society meeting in Philadelphia, researchers are unveiling the results of trials testing the safety and efficacy of cannabidiol. The findings are largely promising. In the biggest study, the number of seizures went down by about half, on average, among children who completed the trial. Benefits for some continued even after the study was over.

“In the subsequent periods, which are very encouraging, 9 percent of all patients and 13 percent of those with Dravet Syndrome epilepsy were seizure-free,” Dr. Orrin Devinsky, the study’s lead author and a neurologist at the New York University Langone Medical Center, told NPR. “Many have never been seizure-free before.”

The data represent a significant step forward in legitimizing use of cannabis to treat epilepsy, a syndrome that in both children and adults causes debilitating seizures and can be especially difficult to treat. Patients sometimes exhaust traditional anti-seizure medications to no effect.

Despite the findings of CBD’s potential benefit in epilepsy treatment, the study results weren’t all good. In Devinsky’s three-month trial, 16 percent of participants withdrew due to adverse side effects or after deciding the treatment was ineffective. And in a yearlong study of 25 patients, one participant actually experienced more frequent seizures.

Participants in the studies didn’t smoke or vaporize cannabis flowers or concentrates. Rather, they consumed cannabidiol in the form of daily doses of purified extracts that had been derived from cannabis plants.

Parents across the country have turned to high-CBD strains after hearing about their sometimes life-changing benefits. Charlotte’s Web, for example, was developed in 2011 and popularized after it was used successfully to treat epileptic seizures in a Colorado girl, Charlotte Figi. While Figi’s story has encouraged lawmakers in some states to loosen regulations on high-CBD strains, many desperate parents still obtain the drug illegally. And because of a lack of scientific evidence to justify their decision, they often face stigma — not to mention the risk of jail time — for giving their children cannabis.

Until recently, clinical trials involving cannabis have been almost nonexistent. As a federally controlled substance, the drug has been impossible to study except with government approval. But as legalization spreads, information about the efficacy of cannabis in treating various ailments will likely become ever more available.

If you’re not familiar with Charlotte’s Web, watch this video about Charlotte Figi and her family:

VIDEO CHARLOTTE

Source: Leafly

Check Your Stash: Full list covering recalls for pesticides

Will 2015 be remembered as the year legal marijuana first encountered — and eventually figured out — its pesticide problem?

The national conversation surrounding pesticide application on cannabis blew up this year. The hot topic has made headlines in Oregon, Washington, New Hampshire, California and elsewhere — but nowhere was the conversation more heated and involved than in Colorado, the first U.S. state to start selling legal cannabis.

Lucas Targos, the head grower at L'Eagle, sprays marijuana plants in the cultivation room with neem oil, which helps combat spider mites and mildew and has been approved for use by the state in certain products. (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)
Lucas Targos, the head grower at L’Eagle, sprays marijuana plants in the cultivation room with neem oil, which helps combat spider mites and mildew and has been approved for use by the state in certain products. (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

It began after more than 100,000 plants were put on hold because of pesticide concerns. Inspections were stepped-up in cultivation facilities. A lot of questions were asked — but not a lot of them had answers. The industry reacted to the changing landscape — but the industry also flexed its political muscle in an effort to delay state and city efforts to enact pesticide regulations.

My colleagues and I at The Denver Post and The Cannabist commissioned independent tests on marijuana concentrates, and the results — which showed high levels of banned pesticides in one popular brand, Mahatma — spurred a Denver Department of Environmental Health investigation thatrecalled Mahatma products, and now many others.

The pesticides-and-pot conversations in Colorado served as a gateway to other related issues. The Post learned that Colorado’s attorney general was investigating several marijuana businesses overconcerns the word “organic” in their names or advertising might be misleading to consumers. Colorado’s former agriculture commissioner said the marijuana industry “was the biggest obstacle we had” in devising any effective pesticide regulation. And more than two months after their first pot recall, Denver health officials started requiring marijuana companies that recall products tainted with unapproved pesticides to use their websites and social media accounts to alert consumers, who weren’t returning many of the recalled products, The Post learned.

A screen grab from the press release announcing EdiPure's first recall of marijuana-infused edibles shows how customers can find out if any of the products they've purchased have been recalled via batch numbers. (Denver Department of Environmental Health)
A screen grab from the press release announcing EdiPure’s first recall of marijuana-infused edibles shows how customers can find out if any of the products they’ve purchased have been recalled via batch numbers. (Denver Department of Environmental Health)

Even though no sicknesses have yet been attributed to the use of these banned pesticides, a pair of marijuana users in Colorado — one of them a medical-card holder with a brain tumor — have sued the state’s largest pot grower for allegedly using a potentially dangerous pesticide on the pot they later purchased. The state proposed new rules that would further restrict which pesticides can be used to grow marijuana. Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper issued an executive order telling state agencies that any marijuana grown with unapproved pesticides is a threat to public safety and should be removed from commerce and destroyed. TheU.S. Environmental Protection Agency put the onus on the makers of pesticides to prove their safety.

And meanwhile, the recalls of marijuana and pot products keep rolling. Because each recall of pesticide-tainted cannabis involves long lists of items associated with often-lengthy batch numbers, The Cannabist has compiled all of the available information in one place for readers concerned about the purity of their pot. So below you’ll find our reporting on each recall — as well as the city of Denver’s press releases on the recalls, which contain exact information to help users identify any tainted pot and cannabis products they might have.

Do you have pesticide-peppered pot in your stash? Find out now — and we will keep this list updated.

Kamba Rembe: el pueblo paraguayo que planta y odia a la marihuana

A finales de mayo, la Secretaría Antidrogas de Paraguay (SENAD) descubrió 13 toneladas de marihuana en un carguero navegando a través del río Paraguay. El capitán del barco, alertado de que un fiscal lo escoltaba, se suicidó antes de llegar al muelle.

La marihuana decomisada del navío “salió de acá”, explica a VICE News un campesino que hace 17 años siembra, cosecha y vende cannabis en Kamba Rembe, una colonia agrícola de 4.600 habitantes perdida entre caminos de tierra roja en el departamento de San Pedro a menos de 200 kilómetros de la extensa frontera seca del Paraguay con Brasil.

El labriego dice que en el pueblo, nueve de cada diez consiguen su renta del cannabis. Este cultivador llegó a cosechar cinco hectáreas él solo. Siembra 10 kilos de semillas por hectárea y vende en su casa a cinco euros el quilo de marihuana prensada.

El ‘ladrillo’ lo llevan a la capital, Asunción. Pero también a las ciudades de Capitán Bado y Pedro Juan Caballero — fronterizas con Brasil —, a Encarnación — límite con Argentina en el Río Paraná — y hasta Uruguay o Chile.

En San Pedro, siete de cada diez hombres se dedican a la agricultura, la silvicultura, la caza, la agricultura o la ganadería. Kamba Rembe no es la excepción. Pero la falta de tecnología, de compradores honestos, el bajo precio de la mandioca y las extensiones de soja, donde trabajan pocas personas, no ayudan al desarrollo del campesinado.

La mandioca, uno de los orgullos de la colonia agrícola fundada hace 25 años, se vende a siete mil guaraníes, es decir a un euro, la bolsa de 70 quilos. Hace diez años casi la mitad de la población de San Pedro tenía alguna necesidad básica insatisfecha en su vivienda.

Uno de cada tres sampedranos estaba subocupado o desempleado. En esa época creció la plantación de cannabis. “Era la única forma de pagar a las financieras y los bancos”, destaca cerveza en mano un agricultor de cara curtida por el sol, nariz enrojecida por la bebida y uñas negras en manos ásperas.

La agricultura tradicional apenas aporta ingresos a los labriegos locales por lo que muchos han apostado por el cultivo de la marihuana. (Imagen por Guillermo Garat)

Primero la yerba mate dejó de ser rentable, luego el precio del algodón se fue al piso. La tecnificación del cultivo de maíz, tabaco y mandioca también golpeó a los agricultores locales. Apostaron por el sésamo y volvieron a perder. El precio bajó y los compradores les pagaron — les pagan — lo que quieren. Muchos pequeños productores volvieron a endeudarse.

“Los pequeños productores cosechan 1200 kilos de maíz por hectárea. Mientras que su vecino, que produce tecnificado, tira 8000. Además, en la chacra campesina hay plagas y enfermedades. El cannabis se ‘culturalizó’. Es como cualquier otra planta. Es el cultivo más rentable”, se lamenta a VICE News Marcelino Araní, educador popular de la Escuela Técnica Agraria de Kamba Rembe. “Hace tiempo que el cannabis está a la vista de todos, incluso de las autoridades”, destaca.

El jornalero rural, que en Paraguay trabaja con machete y azada, puede ganar hasta nueve euros por día durante la cosecha de cannabis que no requiere la última tecnología, sino manos. En el distrito de general Resquín, al que pertenece Kamba Rembe, jóvenes y adultos cultivan cannabis como en otras localidades de San Pedro y de los vecinos Amambay, Canindeyú, Concepción, departamentos fronterizos con Brasil donde el cultivo comenzó a finales de los años sesenta.

Abastecer al mercado suramericano

La demanda de cannabis paraguayo en Brasil es altísima. La Autoridad Fiscalizadora Internacional (JIFE), estima que el 80 por ciento de lo que se fuma en Brasil es paraguayo. También es el que se consume en el Mercosur, Chile y últimamente cruza el Chaco desértico hasta Bolivia.

La JIFE calcula que 6.000 hectáreas anuales se plantan en Paraguay. Las autoridades de la SENAD hablan de 7.000 hectáreas.

La última incursión de la SENAD en Kamba Rembe, se anunció en las radios locales. Los campesinos corrieron de las parcelas. “No buscamos detener al eslabón más débil. Cuando erradicamos es ostensible. Nos contactamos con las radios del interior del país”, explica a VICE News, Luis Rojas, director de la SENAD.

Era finales de agosto, época de cosecha, faltaban pocos días para cortar el “buche” [la flor]. Las hojas ya habían amarilleado y comenzaban a caer.

Los cultivadores sembraron una variedad llamada “mentolada”, que por sus cualidades organolépticas parece autofloreciente, se cosecha en tres meses y fue introducida en los últimos tres años.

Marihuana prensada de San Pedro. (Imagen por Guillermo Garat)

Con la clásica planta paraguaya, una sativa que alcanza dos metros sin esfuerzo, se obtienen unos 800 kilos por hectárea. Con la nueva semilla se pueden obtener hasta 2.000 y se cosecha tres veces por año. Además, el cannabis cada vez se esconde menos y convive con la huerta familiar, por lo que se ve y se huele.

Aquella última semana de agosto la policía antidroga no fue tan brutal como antes cuando, además de violencia de género, practicaban el robo de gallinas, chanchos y/o saqueaban las heladeras de un jornalero y su familia muerta de miedo.

Los niños no están tranquilos en la escuela cuando escuchan las aspas de los helicópteros o ven los camiones militares alborotar la calma pueblerina. “Los procedimientos eran muy temidos. Se creaba toda una psicosis, un problema psicológico para las criaturas”, rememora a VICE News René Noguera, director de la Escuela Técnica Agraria de Kamba Rembe.

Esta vez, la policía especializada entró en ciertas casas sin orden judicial. El cuerpo de elite robó cigarros, cerveza, carne y otros víveres a una despensa del pueblito. Fueron prepotentes, pero no golpearon, ni se llevaron a nadie detenido.

Los ‘antidrogas’ estuvieron unos días en la zona. A puro machetazo eliminaron 120 hectáreas de cannabis en unos días de trabajo. Es decir destrozaron el sustento económico de casi todo el pueblo.

Gabriel Dos Santos, dirigente del Comité de Desarrollo Sustentable de Kamba Rembe, tiene un tractor para dar vuelta la tierra de sus vecinos. Pero hace un mes que no lo mueve porque el pueblo está paralizado.”Tenés que ver lo que es el hambre, cuando hay fuego en la olla pero no hay carne”, lamenta a VICE News.

La realidad parece darle la razón. El 2 de septiembre, unos días después de la operación policial, 3.000 campesinos se reunieron en una hora para elaborar un plan de desarrollo y presentarlo al gobierno. Pararon el pueblo, llamaron a los medios de comunicación que llegaron con fotógrafos, micrófonos y cámaras.

Gabriel Dos Santos en su chacra de Kamba Rembe. Fue uno de los niños que ocuparon hace 25 años las tierras de la colonia. Hoy es su principal dirigente. (Imagen por Guillermo Garat)

El 3 de setiembre pararon el pueblo, educación, transporte y otros trabajos. Fue la primera comunidad que le puso cara al cultivo de marihuana.

El gobierno tuvo que responder. Una delegación gubernamental de veinte personas de traje y corbata se sentó en los pupitres de un aula. Enfrente, los campesinos con ropas teñidas de rojo como su tierra, hablaban de pasar a los cítricos, hortalizas, forestación, lechería y hasta gusanos de seda.

Los agricultores caminería, invernaderos, reforestar 800 hectáreas, tecnificar el cultivo de mandioca, innovar con la stevia e impulsar la caña de azúcar. También quieren aprender a gestionar las cuencas hídricas y proteger el suelo. Además anotaron necesidades en salud, vivienda y educación.

Después de la primera reunión, consiguieron 40 mil plantines de tomates, aunque faltan herramientas, tractores, media sombra y fertilizantes, están tratando de vender esa producción a un supermercado.

De sustento a ‘hierba maldita’

En Kamba Rembé nadie quiere plantar marihuana, le dicen “la hierba maldita”. Tampoco les interesa el debate de la legalización. El pueblo no quiere más marihuana, pero está en la encrucijada.

“Cuando termina un rubro económico hay dos opciones. O subsistir hasta vender la tierra o plantar cannabis. Si no el campesino vende la tierra y emigra. Así va desapareciendo la colonia”, destaca a VICE News el ingeniero agrónomo Noguera que trabaja en Kamba Rembe desde los años noventa.

Hubo un compromiso con el gobierno: habrá ayuda si terminan el cultivo de cannabis. El pueblo en asamblea, aceptó. El cultivador que llegó a cosechar cinco hectáreas él solo ya no planta. No quiere involucrar a la comunidad.

Noguera dice que algunos cultivadores podrían emigrar del pueblo, como pasó con Lima, un poblado que expulsó a los campesinos del cannabis que hace quince años se instalaron en Kamba Rembe y alrededores.

La marihuana “está mal, porque un joven puede perder su vida, su futuro y hasta su familia. Quedás mal con la sociedad, ya no te verá como un adolescente normal. Ya no te darán más trabajo. Quedarás aparte. No directamente, pero ya no te brindarán más oportunidades”, dice serio y sin gesticular a VICE News, Ángel Darío Villalba.

El joven de 19 años gusta de las hortalizas y sobre todo del tomate. Próximamente regresará de la Escuela Técnica Agrícola de Kamba Rembe.

Ángel Darío quiere un trabajo “digno” para su futuro cercano. “Si trabajás técnicamente”, la horticultura “puede dar más que el cannabis”, al menos así lo cree.

Earth Science Tech Announces Positive Interim results from Trial with Former Professional Football Athletes Using ETST High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol)

Boca Raton, Nov. 19, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — BOCA RATON, FL / Earth Science Tech, Inc. (ETST) (“ETST” or “the Company”), a unique biotechnology publicly traded company focused on nutraceuticals, bioceuticals and dietary supplements, announces interim results from phase 1 in introducing the ETST line of Nutraceutical and Bioceutical products to former professional athletes.

 

Approximately 2 weeks ago, ETST initiated its breakthrough trial study involving former professional football players using its Hemp CBD Oil. On the first day participants answered a number of questions scaling the intensity of various pain symptoms. They were all given doses of high potency Hemp CBD Oil to administer for 30 days two times a day. On day 15, the participants answered another series of questions scaling their pain levels. These preliminary results suggest a marked improvement in the participants’ pain levels.

 

The Former players and current candidates will be requested to submit a report of their affected physical and mental health at the conclusion of this trial. ETST is very excited about the future health implications suggested by these initial results. Although this is a first step on a long road, ETST looks forward to conducting future trial studies with former professional athletes.

 

ETST High Grade Hemp CBD is derived from imported 100% industrial hemp. ETST High Grade Hemp CBD Products contain hundreds of micronutrients (phytonutrients). These include Terpenoids, Essential Oils and Antioxidants. The most dynamic are a group of compounds called Cannabinoids that have been found to exist in Hemp and the human body. In addition to the cannabinoids present in our industrial hemp oil extracts, there are also many other types of natural molecules and “plant” chemical compounds such as amino acids, sugars, vitamins, fatty acids (including omega 3 & 6), flavanoids, ketones, nitrogenous compounds, alkanes, alcohols, glycosides, pigments, hemp seed oil, water, and terpenes. The most common terpenes in our CBD oils are Beta-caryophyllene, Caryophyllene Oxide, Myrcene, Terpinolene, Bisabolol, Pinene, Nerolidol, Ocimene and Phytol. Hemp oil contains more essential fatty acids than any other plant.

To view Scientific Research and Data on Earth Science Tech (ETST) High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) please visit http://www.earthsciencetech.com/scientific-research.

ETST invites all interested parties to contact the company at info@earthsciencetech.com in order to secure its “High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil” in bulk for wholesale, resale or distribution. From product formulating, mixing, labeling and launching ETST can do it all. ETST is always open to forming new strategic partnerships, joint ventures and/or supplying vendors, resellers and third party distribution companies with its High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil/Products at wholesale prices in order to better help supply consumers as well as the health and wellness markets on a large scale. You can view, research and purchase small quantities or bottles of ETST High Grade CBD (Cannabidiol) Rich Hemp Oil at http://www.earthsciencetech.com/cbd-rich-hemp-oil.

ETST is focused on the science, research and studies of its High Grade Hemp CBD Oil as a health and wellness, nutraceutical and dietary supplement. In order to assure the public that ETST provides the best High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil, we continue to focus on providing the public with sound scientific research and keeping the public informed on the progression of studies being done on our Hemp CBD products. ETST has engaged the expertise of a leading USA independent biological company and has been doing scientific research and studies with a University. Science is what will progress the future of ETST High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil and its products. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally occurring constituent of industrial hemp oil. It is the most abundant non-psychoactive cannabinoid in hemp and is commonly used as a dietary supplement to support general wellness. ETST hemp derived, high CBD, full-spectrum phyto-cannabinoid oil blends are made from top quality, Grade-A European hemp cultivars, grown in pristine soil in choice European locations. ETST High Grade Hemp CBD oils are constantly analyzed for their purity and purity from potential contaminants. ETST encourages researching cannabidiol (CBD) from reliable informational sources to see what is being investigated and discussed about CBD oil. Numerous properties and benefits of CBD are being investigated at academic research centers in the United States and elsewhere. The FDA has not evaluated the validity or truthfulness of these claims; therefore, we encourage you to review published researches relating to the benefits and properties of CBD hemp oils and other CBD products.

Humans are designed with a built-in Endocannabinoid System (ECS): Research shows that many scientists believe cannabinoids work synergistically to support the whole human endo-cannabinoid system (internal and natural human cannabinoid system). It is your body’s way of communicating with itself and properly regulating the way every other body system functions from your brain to your toes. The Endocannabinoid System (ECS) has shown to control pain sensation, appetite, temperature regulation, stress reactivity, immune function, and sleep as well as other processes. Even more interesting is that muscle and fat tissue also utilize these receptors to control their processes. Consumers should think of the Endocannabinoid System as one of the body’s main control and command centers for tweaking your metabolism’s ability to react and adapt to the world around it. Like many other nutrients in our diet, Cannabinoids can become exhausted and in need of steady dietary replenishment. Scientific studies and data show that Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil as well as all micronutrients (phytonutrients) and phyto-cannabinoids found in the oil work in harmony with the human body’s own endocannabinoid system making a positive effect for overall wellness. Hemp oil contains CBD — a non-psychoactive compound of the plant. There are millions of hemp oil consumers around the world and this number is rapidly rising with an increasing number of reports and studies showing a variety of benefits of hemp oil.

ETST High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol): ETST High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil is formulated using a wide array of cutting-edge technologies. ETST’s High Grade Hemp CBD Oil is all-natural and derived completely from the federally legal industrial hemp plant. Industrial Hemp (Hemp) is not marijuana and will not get you ‘high’ and it does not require a medical license of any kind to authorize purchase. It is lab tested multiple times during the manufacturing process, from seed to shelf. This also includes being tested for CBD content, other Cannabinoid content, yeast/mold/fungus, and bacteria like E. coli to ensure safety and top quality. ETST believes that Hemp CBD Oil awareness today is where Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids were 15 to 20 years ago. One of ETST’s pertinent objectives is to help consumers Worldwide with their overall wellness through advanced formulations with its High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil and other cutting edge nutraceuticals and dietary supplements. Hemp CBD Oil is poised to be the most renowned and effective natural compound and botanical alternative introduced to the nutritional and dietary supplement industry in decades. Consumers worldwide desperately need more effective safe botanical alternatives to help them with their overall health and internal wellness. Modern science has identified over 400 phytonutrients in various parts of the industrial hemp plant. These include hundreds of Terpenoids, Essential Oils and Antioxidants but perhaps the most dynamic are a group of 80 compounds called Cannabinoids that are exclusively found in Hemp and one other place; our bodies. There are roughly 80 different phyto-cannabinoids, most prominently CBD, CBC, CBG, CBN, and most likely others yet to be effectively identified. In addition to the cannabinoids present in High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil extracts, there are also many other types of natural molecules such as amino acids, fatty acids, flavonoids, ketones, nitrogenous compounds, alkanes, alcohols, glycosides, pigments and terpenes among other things. The most common terpenes in our Hemp CBD oils are Beta-caryophyllene, Caryophyllene Oxide, Myrcene, Terpinolene, α Bisabolol, α Pinene, Nerolidol, Ocimene and Phytol.

About Earth Science Tech, Inc. (ETST): Earth Science Tech (www.earthsciencetech.com) is a publicly traded (symbol: ETST) unique Science based Biotechnology company focused on cutting edge Nutraceuticals, Bioceuticals, Phytoceuticals and Cosmeceuticals for the Health, Wellness and Alternative Medicine Markets to help improve the quality of life for Consumers Worldwide. ETST is also dedicated to providing Natural Alternatives to prescription medications through the use of its cutting edge Nutritional and Dietary Supplements. This may include products such as its High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil, Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs, Botanicals, Personal Care Products, Homeopathies, Functional Foods and other products. These products may be in various formulations and delivery systems including (but not limited to) capsules, tablets, soft gels, chewables, liquids, creams, sprays, powders, and whole herbs. ETST is focused on researching and developing innovative Hemp extracts and to make them accessible Worldwide. ETST plans to be the premier supplier of the highest quality and purity of High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil. ETST’s primary goal is to advance different High Quality Hemp extracts with a broad profile of Cannabinoids and additional natural molecules found in Industrial Hemp and to identify their distinct properties. The company is dedicated in offering its consumers the finest and purest quality All Natural-Organic Hemp CBD Oil while never compromising on quality. ETST High Grade Hemp CBD (Cannabidiol) Oil is classified as “food based” and therefore perfectly permissible in all 50 states and more than 40 countries. Cannabinoids (Cannabidiol/CBD) are natural constituents of the Hemp plant and CBD is derived from Hemp stalk and seed. Hemp oil is a well-known dietary supplement and the naturally occurring CBD possesses no psychoactive qualities and presents a continuing stream of overwhelming evidence of significant Wellness benefits. With no psychoactive ingredient, Hemp CBD Oil is a ready-for-market Hemp-based Nutraceutical. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) currently considers non-THC hemp based cannabinoids, including CBD, to be “food based” and therefore saleable. These new non-psychoactive CBD-rich hemp oil products that ETST has geared up to market and distribute are beyond reproach. CBD (cannabidiol), a naturally occurring constituent of the Industrial Hemp plant, promotes and supports the nutritional health of aging bodies in particular. Source: US Government Patent #6,630,507 “Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants.” ETST does not grow, sell or distribute any substances that violate United States Law or the controlled substance act. ETST does sell and distribute hemp based products.

Make sure to visit ETST at:

ETST Corporate Website: www.earthsciencetech.com

ETST Twitter: https://twitter.com/earthsciencetec

ETST Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Earthsciencetech

ETST Instagram: https://instagram.com/earthsciencetech

Investors Hangout: http://investorshangout.com/Earth-Science-Tech-Inc-ETST-68047/

Source: GlobeNewswire

Estiman que el Cannabis será el cultivo más rentable de Colombia

La decisión para legalizar el cannabis para uso medicinal en Colombia dependerá de los ajustes que se apliquen al borrador del decreto que está creando el Ejecutivo,texto que se filtró el 13 de noviembre a los medios de comunicación. El ministro de Agricultura, Aurelio Iragorri, informó que el crecimiento del cultivo dependerá de la demanda internacional y de la regulación del Estado.

Cannabis.

“El mercado de esos productos tiene un crecimiento exponencial en el mundo, por lo que estoy convencido de que va a jalonar de manera importante la actividad en la economía colombiana. Nosotros fuimos los reyes en la producción ilegal, ahora tenemos la oportunidad en la parte legal”, explicó Iragorri.

Por otro lado, el presidente de la Sociedad de Agricultores de Colombia (SAC), Rafael Mejía, opinó que la propuesta era adecuada y que el país podría convertirse en una potencia para suministrarle al mundo. “La demanda de marihuana ya es muy grande, el reto está en poder mantenerla dentro de las normas para que no se salga del plano de la salud, lo que implica un control muy complejo”, manifestó.

El presidente de DrugScience (formalmente el Comité Científico Independiente sobre Drogas), Jon Gettman, reveló que en Colombia la marihuana estimula más el mercado que el maíz y el trigo juntos (US$30.800 millones). Por lo tanto, es visto como el cultivo más rentable en la actualidad.

El director científico de Cannamedic, Camilo Borrero Martínez, cultiva, procesa y comercializa seis productos derivados del cannabis en su propio laboratorio. “La reglamentación es una oportunidad para grandes y pequeños, para proteger nuestra propiedad intelectual”, determinó Borrero, quien tiene años tramitando los permisos. Su empresa se creó en 2009 y es una de las 15 registradas en el país; sin embargo, lucha para que su producto sea visto como medicinal y no se compare con el del mercado negro.

El profesor de Toxicología de la Universidad Nacional, Jairo Tellez, advirtió que podrían haber problemas si personas naturales manipulan la planta. “Es como pretender producir antibióticos en casa”, dijo. De igual forma, el procurador Alejandro Ordoñez y el presidente del Congreso, José David Name, desaprobaron la regulación del cannabis porque puede llegar a incentivar el uso recreativo.

Solo este año Colombia exportará US$2.200 millones entre el mercado de flores y el de plátanos. Se estima que si se llega a legalizar la droga, el negocio de la marihuana medicinal podría equivaler a ese comercio.

Fuente: CannabisMagazine

State-by-State Guide to Cannabis Advertising Regulations

As the cannabis industry continues to grow at a rapid pace, it can feel overwhelming to keep up-to-date with the constantly-changing federal and state regulations. Advertising regulations are especially strict, as many marketing platforms restrict or outright ban cannabis advertisements due to the substance’s federal status.

We put together a state-by-state guide to cannabis advertising regulations that should help cannabis businesses adhere to the guidelines set forth by both the state they’re operating in as well as any states in which they want to advertise. Be sure to check back constantly as we update this guide to reflect new changes and restrictions.

Click on a state to jump down to its list of cannabis advertising regulations:

 

Alaska Arizona California Colorado Connecticut
Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii
Illinois Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan
Minnesota Montana Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey
New Mexico New York Oregon Rhode Island Texas
Vermont Washington

 

Alaska

Final advertising regulations for retail cannabis are to be determined. For more information, please refer to the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services Division of Public Health.

 

Arizona

There are currently no advertising regulations for medical marijuana dispensaries in Arizona. For more information, please refer to the Rules & Statutes for the Arizona Medical Marijuana Program.

 

California

Refer to section 2525.5. of the Medical Marijuana Regulation and Safety Act:

(a) A person shall not distribute any form of advertising for physician recommendations for medical cannabis in California unless the advertisement bears the following notice to consumers:

NOTICE TO CONSUMERS: The Compassionate Use Act of 1996 ensures that seriously ill Californians have the right to obtain and use cannabis for medical purposes where medical use is deemed appropriate and has been recommended by a physician who has determined that the person’s health would benefit from the use of medical cannabis. Recommendations must come from an attending physician as defined in Section 11362.7 of the Health and Safety Code. Cannabis is a Schedule I drug according to the federal Controlled Substances Act. Activity related to cannabis use is subject to federal prosecution, regardless of the protections provided by state law.

(b) Advertising for attending physician recommendations for medical cannabis shall meet all of the requirements in Section 651. Price advertising shall not be fraudulent, deceitful, or misleading, including statements or advertisements of bait, discounts, premiums, gifts, or statements of a similar nature.

 

Colorado

Refer to the Colorado Retail Marijuana Regulations:

R 1102 – Advertising General Requirement: No Deceptive, False or Misleading Statements

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising that is deceptive, false, or misleading. A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not make any deceptive, false, or misleading assertions or statements on any product, any sign, or any document provided to a consumer.

R 1104 –Advertising: Television

A. Television Defined. As used in this rule, the term “television” means a system for transmitting visual images and sound that are reproduced on screens, and includes broadcast, cable, on-demand, satellite, or internet programming. Television includes any video programming downloaded or streamed via the internet.

B. Television Advertising. A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not utilize television Advertising unless the Retail Marijuana Establishment has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the audience for the program on which the Advertising is to air is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.

R 1105 –Advertising: Radio

A. Radio Defined. As used in this rule, the term “radio” means a system for transmitting sound without visual images, and includes broadcast, cable, on-demand, satellite, or internet programming. Radio includes any audio programming downloaded or streamed via the internet.

B. Radio Advertising. A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in radio Advertising unless the Retail Marijuana Establishment has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the audience for the program on which the Advertising is to air is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.

R 1106 –Advertising: Print Media

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising in a print publication unless the Retail Marijuana Establishment has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the publication’s readership is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.

R 1107 –Advertising: Internet

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising via the internet unless the Retail Marijuana Establishment has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the audience for the internet web site is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21. See also Rule R 1114 – Pop-Up Advertising.

R 1108 – Advertising: Targeting Out-of-State Persons Prohibited.

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising that specifically targets Persons located outside the state of Colorado.

R 1109 – Signage and Advertising: No Safety Claims Because Regulated by State Licensing Authority

No Retail Marijuana Establishment may engage in Advertising or utilize signage that asserts its products are safe because they are regulated by the State Licensing Authority.

R 1110– Signage and Advertising: No Safety Claims Because Tested by a Retail Marijuana Testing Facility

A Retail Marijuana Establishment may advertise that its products have been tested by a Retail Marijuana Testing Facility, but shall not engage in Advertising or utilize signage that asserts its products are safe because they are tested by a Retail Marijuana Testing Facility

R 1111– Signage and Advertising: Outdoor Advertising

A. Local Ordinances. In addition to any requirements within these rules, a Retail Marijuana Establishment shall comply with any applicable local ordinances regulating signs and Advertising.

B. Outdoor Advertising Generally Prohibited. Except as otherwise provided in this rule, it shall be unlawful for any Retail Marijuana Establishment to engage in Advertising that is visible to members of the public from any street, sidewalk, park or other public place, including Advertising utilizing any of the following media: any billboard or other outdoor general Advertising device; any sign mounted on a vehicle, any hand-held or other portable sign; or any handbill, leaflet or flier directly handed to any person in a public place, left upon a motor vehicle, or posted upon any public or private property without the consent of the property owner.

C. Exception. The prohibitions set forth in this rule shall not apply to any fixed sign that is located on the same zone lot as a Retail Marijuana Establishment and that exists solely for the purpose of identifying the location of the Retail Marijuana Establishment and otherwise complies with any applicable local ordinances

R 1112– Signage and Advertising: No Content That Targets Minors

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not include in any form of Advertising or signage any content that specifically targets individuals under the age of 21, including but not limited to cartoon characters or similar images.

R 1113 – Advertising: Advertising via Marketing Directed Toward Location-Based Devices

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising via marketing directed towards location-based devices, including but not limited to cellular phones, unless the marketing is a mobile device application installed on the device by the owner of the device who is 21 year of age or older and includes a permanent and easy opt-out feature.

R 1114 – Pop-Up Advertising

A Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not utilize unsolicited pop-up Advertising on the internet.

R 1115 – Advertising: Event Sponsorship

A Retail Marijuana Establishment may sponsor a charitable, sports, or similar event, but a Retail Marijuana Establishment shall not engage in Advertising at, or in connection with, such an event unless the Retail Marijuana Establishment has reliable evidence that no more than 30 percent of the audience at the event and/or viewing Advertising in connection with the event is reasonably expected to be under the age of 21.

 

Connecticut

Refer to the State of Connecticut Regulation of the Department of Consumer Protection Concerning the Palliative Use of Medical Marijuana:

Sec. 21a-408-66. Marketing: prohibited conduct, statements and illustrations; commissioner review of advertisements

(a) There shall be no direct or indirect cooperative advertising between or among two or more of the following: a producer, dispensary facility personnel, or physician where such advertising has the purpose or effect of steering or influencing patient or caregiver choice with regard to their selection of a physician, dispensary or marijuana product.

(b) An advertisement for marijuana or any marijuana product shall not contain:

(1) Any statement that is false or misleading in any material particular or is otherwise in violation of the Connecticut Unfair Trade Practices Act, section 42-110b et seq., of the Connecticut General Statutes;

(2) any statement that falsely disparages a competitor’s products;

(3) any statement, design, or representation, picture or illustration that is obscene or indecent;

(4) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration that encourages or represents the use of marijuana for a condition other than a debilitating medical condition;

(5) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration that encourages or represents the recreational use of marijuana;

(6) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration related to the safety or efficacy of marijuana unless supported by substantial evidence or substantial clinical data;

(7) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration portraying anyone under the age of 18, objects suggestive of the presence of anyone under the age of 18, or contains the use of a figure, symbol or language that is customarily associated with anyone under the age of 18;

(8) any offer of a prize or award to a qualifying patient, primary caregiver or physician related to he purchase of marijuana or a certification for the use of marijuana; or

(9) any statement that indicates or implies that the product or entity in the advertisement has been approved or endorsed by the commissioner, department, the State of Connecticut or any person or entity associated with the State of Connecticut.

(c) Any advertisement for marijuana or a marijuana product shall be submitted to the commissioner at the same time as, or prior to, the dissemination of the advertisement.

(d) The submitter of the advertisement shall provide the following information in addition to the advertisement itself:

(1) A cover letter that:

(A) Provides the following subject line: Medical marijuana advertisement review Package for a proposed advertisement for [Brand Name];

(B) Provides a brief description of the format and expected distribution of the proposed advertisement; and

(C) Provides the submitter’s name, title, address, telephone number, fax number, and email address;

(2) An annotated summary of the proposed advertisement showing every claim being made in the advertisement and which references support each claim;

(3) Verification that a person identified in an advertisement as an actual patient or health care practitioner is an actual patient or health care practitioner and not a model or actor;

(4) Verification that a spokesperson who is represented as a real patient is indeed an actual patient;

(5) Verification that an official translation of a foreign language advertisement is accurate;

(6) Annotated references to support disease or epidemiology information, cross-referenced to the advertisement summary; and

(7) A final copy of the advertisement, including a video where applicable, in an acceptable format.

(e) Advertising packages that are missing any of the elements in subsection (g) of this section, or that fail to follow the specific details for submissions, shall be considered incomplete. If the department receives an incomplete package, it shall so notify the submitter.

(f) The commissioner may:

(1) Require a specific disclosure be made in the advertisement in a clear and conspicuous manner if the commissioner determines that the advertisement would be false or misleading without such a disclosure; or

(2) Make recommendations with respect to changes that are:

(A) Necessary to protect the public health, safety and welfare; or

(B) Consistent with dispensing information for the product under review.

 

(3) If appropriate and if information exists, recommend statements for inclusion in the advertisement to address the specific efficacy of the drug as it relates to specific disease states, disease symptoms and population groups.

Sec. 21a-408-67. Marijuana advertising; requirements for true statements and fair balance

(a) All advertisements for marijuana or marijuana products that make a statement relating to side effects, contraindications and effectiveness shall present a true statement of such information. When applicable, advertisements broadcast through media such as radio, television, or other electronic media shall include such information in the audio or audio and visual parts of the presentation.

(b) False or misleading information in any part of the advertisement will not be corrected by the inclusion of a true statement in another distinct part of the advertisement.

(c) An advertisement does not satisfy the requirement that it present a “true statement” of information relating to side effects, consequences, contraindications, and effectiveness if it fails to present a fair balance between information relating to side effects, consequences, contraindications and effectiveness in that the information relating to effectiveness is presented in greater scope, depth, or detail than is the information relating to side effects, consequences and contraindications, taking into account all implementing factors such as typography, layout, contrast, headlines, paragraphing, white space, and any other techniques apt to achieve emphasis.

(d) An advertisement is false, lacking in fair balance, or otherwise misleading if it:

(1) Contains a representation or suggestion that a marijuana strain, brand or product is better, more effective, useful in a broader range of conditions or patients or safer than other drugs or treatments including other marijuana strains or products, unless such a claim has been demonstrated by substantial evidence or substantial clinical experience;

(2) Contains favorable information or opinions about a marijuana product previously regarded as valid but which have been rendered invalid by contrary and more credible recent information;

(3) Uses a quote or paraphrase out of context or without citing conflicting information from the same source, to convey a false or misleading idea;

(4) Uses a study on individuals without a debilitating medical condition without disclosing that the subjects were not suffering from a debilitating medical condition;

(5) Uses data favorable to a marijuana product derived from patients treated with a different product or dosages different from those approved in Connecticut;

(6) Contains favorable information or conclusions from a study that is inadequate in design, scope, or conduct to furnish significant support for such information or conclusions; or

(7) Fails to provide adequate emphasis for the fact that two or more facing pages are part of the same advertisement when only one page contains information relating to side effects, consequences and contraindications.

(e) No advertisement may be disseminated if the submitter of the advertisement has received information that has not been widely publicized in medical literature that the use of the marijuana product or strain may cause fatalities or serious damage.

Sec. 21a-408-68. Marijuana marketing; advertising at a dispensary facility; advertising prices

(a) A dispensary facility shall:

(1) Restrict external signage to a single sign no larger than 16 X 18 inches;

(2) Not illuminate a dispensary facility sign advertising a marijuana product at any time;

(3) Not advertise marijuana brand names or utilize graphics related to marijuana or paraphernalia on the exterior of the dispensary facility or the building in which the dispensary facility is located; and

(4) Not display marijuana and paraphernalia so as to be clearly visible from the exterior of a dispensary facility.

 

(b) A producer shall not advertise the price of its marijuana except that it may make a price list available to a dispensary facility.

 

Delaware

Refer to the Delaware Medical Marijuana Act:

(k) No person may advertise medical marijuana sales in print, broadcast, or by paid in-person solicitation of customers. This shall not prevent appropriate signs on the property of the registered compassion center, listings in business directories including phone books, listings in trade or medical publications, or the sponsorship of health or not-for-profit charity or advocacy events.

(l) A registered compassion center shall not share office space with nor refer patients to a physician.

(m) A physician shall not refer patients to a registered compassion center or registered designated caregiver, advertise in a registered compassion center, or, if the physician issues written certifications, hold any financial interest in a registered compassion center.

 

District of Columbia

Refer to the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations for the Medical Marijuana Program:

5105.2 A medical marijuana certification provider shall include the following subjects in its education training program; which shall be submitted to the Department for approval:

(f) Advertising, promotion, and marketing of medical marijuana;

CHAPTER 58 ADVERTISING

5800 SIGN ADVERTISING

5800.1 Advertisements relating to the prices of medical marijuana shall not be displayed in the window of a registered establishment.

5800.2 Advertisements relating to medical marijuana shall not be displayed on the exterior of any window or on the exterior or interior of any door.

5800.3 No sign advertising medical marijuana on the exterior or visible from the exterior of any registered establishment or elsewhere in the District shall be illuminated at any time.

 

Florida

Advertising regulations for Florida authorized distribution centers are to be determined. For more information, please refer to the Compassionate Medical Cannabis Act of 2014.

 

Georgia

Georgia’s medical marijuana advertising regulations are to be determined. For more information, please refer to House Bill 1.

 

Hawaii

Final dispensary regulations are to be determined. For more information, please visit the State of Hawaii Department of Health Medical Marijuana Registry Program.

 

Illinois

Refer to the Rules for the Administration of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program:

TITLE 68: PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS
CHAPTER VII: DEPARTMENT OF FINANCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION
SUBCHAPTER b: PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS
PART 1290 RULES FOR ADMINISTRATION OF THE COMPASSIONATE USE OF MEDICAL CANNABIS PILOT PROGRAM
SECTION 1290.455 DISPENSARY ADVERTISEMENTS

 

Section 1290.455 Dispensary Advertisements

 

a) No registered dispensing organization shall place or maintain, or cause to be placed or maintained, an advertisement of cannabis or a cannabis-infused product in any form or through any medium:

 

1) Within 1,000 feet of the perimeter of a school grounds, playground, recreation center or facility, child care center, public park or library, or any game arcade admission to which is not restricted to persons age 21 years or older;

2) On or in a public transit vehicle or public transit shelter; or

3) On or in a publicly-owned or-operated property.

 

b) This Section does not apply to a noncommercial message.

 

Maine

There are currently no advertising regulations for registered dispensaries or caregivers in Maine. For more information, please refer to the Rules Governing the Maine Medical Use of Marijuana Program.

 

Maryland

Final medical marijuana regulations are to be determined. For more information, please refer to the Maryland Laws & Regulations FAQ.

 

Massachusetts

Refer to the Implementation of an Act for the Humanitarian Medical Use of Marijuana:

(L) Marketing and Advertising Requirements

(1) A Registered Marijuana Dispensary (RMD) may develop a logo to be used in labeling, signage, and other materials. Use of medical symbols, images of marijuana, related paraphernalia, and colloquial references to cannabis and marijuana are prohibited from use in this logo.

(2) RMD external signage shall not be illuminated except for a period of 30 minutes before sundown until closing, and shall comply with local requirements regarding signage, provided however that the Department may further specify minimum signage requirements. Neon signage is prohibited at all times.

(3) A RMD shall not display on the exterior of the facility advertisements for marijuana or any brand name, and may only identify the building by the registered name.

(4) A RMD shall not utilize graphics related to marijuana or paraphernalia on the exterior of the RMD or the building in which the RMD is located.

5) A RMD shall not advertise the price of marijuana, except that it shall provide a catalogue or a printed list of the prices and strains of marijuana available at the RMD to registered qualifying patients and personal caregivers upon request.

(6) Marijuana, Marijuana Infused Products (MIPs), and associated products shall not be displayed or clearly visible to a person from the exterior of a RMD.

(7) A RMD shall not produce any items for sale or promotional gifts, such as T-shirts or novelty items, bearing a symbol of or references to marijuana or MIPs, including the logo of the RMD.

(8) All advertising materials and materials produced by a RMD and disseminated pursuant to 105 CMR 725.105(K) or (L) are prohibited from including:

(a) Any statement, design, representation, picture, or illustration that encourages or represents the use of marijuana for any purpose other than to treat a debilitating medical condition or related symptoms;

(b) Any statement, design, representation, picture, or illustration that encourages or represents the recreational use of marijuana;

(c) Any statement, design, representation, picture, or illustration related to the safety or efficacy of marijuana unless supported by substantial evidence or substantial clinical data with reasonable scientific rigor, which shall be made available upon the request of a registrant or the Department; or

(d) Any statement, design, representation, picture, or illustration portraying anyone under 18 years of age.

(9) Inside the RMD, all marijuana shall be kept in a limited access area inaccessible to any persons other than dispensary agents, with the exception of displays allowable under 105 CMR 725.105(L)(10). Inside the RMD, all marijuana shall be stored in a locked, access controlled space in a limited access area during non-business hours.

(10) A RMD may display, in secure, locked cases, no more than one sample of each product offered for sale. These display cases may be transparent.

(11) The Department shall maintain and make available a list of all RMDs, their dispensing location, and their contact information.

 

Michigan

There are currently no restrictions on advertising (although there are restrictions on medical marijuana dispensaries) in Michigan. For more information, please refer to the Michigan Medical Marihuana Program.

 

Minnesota

There are currently no restrictions on advertising for medical marijuana manufacturers and distribution centers. For more information, please refer to Minnesota Statutes 2012, Subdivision 22, Medical use of cannabis data.

 

Montana

Refer to the Montana Code Annotated 2015 – Montana Marijuana Act:

50-46-341. Advertising prohibited. Persons with valid registry identification cards may not advertise marijuana or marijuana-related products in any medium, including electronic media.

 

Nevada

Refer to Chapter 453A – Medical Use of Marijuana:

NAC 453A.402  Approval required before use of name, logo, sign and advertisement. (NRS 453A.370)  A medical marijuana establishment shall not use:

1.  A name or logo unless the name or logo has been approved by the Administrator of the Division; or

2.  Any sign or advertisement unless the sign or advertisement has been approved by the Administrator of the Division.

(Added to NAC by Div. of Pub. & Behavioral Health by R004-14, 3-28-2014, eff. 4-1-2014)

 

New Hampshire

Refer to Title X – Public Health, Chapter 126-X, Use of Cannabis for Therapeutic Purposes:

The department shall adopt rules, pursuant to RSA 541-A, governing alternative treatment centers and the manner in which it shall consider applications for registration certificates for alternative treatment centers, including, but not limited to:

(12) Advertising restrictions, including a prohibition of misrepresentation and unfair practices.

 

New Jersey

Leafly has reached out to officials with the State of New Jersey Department of Health’s Medicinal Marijuana Program and are waiting for more comprehensive information on advertising regulations.

For more information, please refer to the state’s Medicinal Marijuana Program.

 

New Mexico

New Mexico currently does not have advertising regulations for medical marijuana dispensaries. For more information, please see the Licensing Requirements for Producers, Couriers, Manufacturers, and Laboratories.

 

New York

Refer to the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York for Medical Marijuana:

§1004.16 Medical marihuana marketing and advertising by registered organizations. Restricts the marketing and advertising of medical marihuana.

(d) All advertisements, regardless of form, for approved medical marihuana products that make a statement relating to effectiveness, side effects, consequences, and contraindications shall present a true and accurate statement of such information.

(e) An advertisement does not satisfy the requirement that it presents a “true and accurate statement” of information relating to effectiveness, side effects, consequences, and contraindications if it fails to present a fair balance between information relating to effectiveness, side effects, consequences, and contraindications in that the information relating to effectiveness is presented in greater scope, depth, or detail than is the information relating to side effects, consequences and contraindications, taking into account all implementing factors such as typography, layout, contrast, headlines, paragraphing, white space, and any other techniques apt to achieve emphasis.

(f) An advertisement is false, lacking in fair balance, or otherwise misleading if it:

(1) contains a representation or suggestion that one marihuana brand or form is better, more effective, useful in a broader range of conditions or patients or safer than other drugs or treatments including other marihuana brands or forms, unless such a claim has been demonstrated by substantial scientific or clinical experience;

(2) Contains favorable information or opinions about a marihuana product previously regarded as valid but which have been rendered invalid by contrary and more credible recent information;

(3) Uses a quote or paraphrase out of context or without citing conflicting information from the same source, to convey a false or misleading idea;

(4) Uses a study on persons without a debilitating medical condition without disclosing that the subjects were not suffering from a debilitating medical condition;

(5) Uses data favorable to a marihuana product derived from patients treated with a different product or dosages different from those recommended in New York State;

(6) Contains favorable information or conclusions from a study that is inadequate in design, scope, or conduct to furnish significant support for such information or conclusions; or

(7) Fails to provide adequate emphasis for the fact that two or more facing pages are part of the same advertisement when only one page contains information relating to side effects, consequences and contraindications.

(g) False or misleading information in any part of the advertisement shall not be corrected by the inclusion of a true statement in another distinct part of the advertisement.

(h) An advertisement for any approved medical marihuana product shall not contain:

(1) any statement that is false or misleading;

(2) any statement that falsely disparages a competitor’s products;

(3) any statement, design, or representation, picture or illustration that is obscene or indecent;

(4) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration that encourages or represents the use of marihuana for a condition other than a serious condition as defined in subdivision seven of section thirty-three hundred sixty of the public health law;

(5) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration that encourages or represents the recreational use of marihuana;

(6) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration related to the safety or efficacy of marihuana, unless supported by substantial evidence or substantial clinical data;

(7) any statement, design, representation, picture or illustration portraying anyone under the age of 18, objects suggestive of the presence of anyone under the age of 18, or containing the use of a figure, symbol or language that is customarily associated with anyone under the age of 18;

(8) any offer of a prize, award or inducement to a certified patient, designated caregiver or practitioner related to the purchase of marihuana or a certification for the use of marihuana; or

(9) any statement that indicates or implies that the product or entity in the advertisement has been approved or endorsed by the commissioner, department, New York State or any person or entity associated with New York State provided that this shall not preclude a factual statement that an entity is a registered organization.

(i) Any advertisement for an approved medical marihuana product shall be submitted to the department at least 30 business days prior to the public dissemination of the advertisement.

(j) The submitter of the advertisement shall provide the following information to the department in addition to the advertisement itself:

(1) A cover letter that:

(i) provides the following subject line: Medical marihuana advertisement review package for a proposed advertisement;

(ii) provides a brief description of the format and expected distribution of the proposed advertisement; and

(iii) provides the submitter’s name, title, address, telephone number, fax number, and email address;

(2) an annotated summary of the proposed advertisement showing every claim being made in the advertisement and which references support for each claim;

(3) verification that a person identified in an advertisement as an actual patient or health care practitioner is an actual patient or health care practitioner and not a model or actor;

(4) verification that a spokesperson who is represented as an actual patient is indeed an actual patient;

(5) verification that an official translation of a foreign language advertisement is accurate;

(6) annotated references to support disease or epidemiology information, cross-referenced to the advertisement summary; and

(7) a final copy of the advertisement, including a video where applicable, in a format acceptable to the department.

(k) Advertising packages that are missing any of the elements in subdivision.

(j) of this section, or that fail to follow the specific instructions for submissions, shall be considered incomplete. If the department receives an incomplete package, it shall so notify the submitter.

(l) No advertisement may be disseminated if the submitter of the advertisement has received information that has not been widely publicized in medical literature that the use of any approved medical marihuana product may cause fatalities or serious damage to a patient.

(m) A registered organization, its officers, managers and employees shall not cooperate, directly or indirectly, in any advertising if such advertising has the purpose or effect of steering or influencing patient or caregiver choice with regard to the selection of a practitioner, or approved medical marihuana product.

(n) The department may:

(1) require a specific disclosure be made in the advertisement in a clear and conspicuous manner if the department determines that the advertisement would be false or misleading without such a disclosure; or

(2) require that changes be made to the advertisement that are:

(i) necessary to protect the public health, safety and welfare; or

(ii) consistent with dispensing information for the product under review.

 

Oregon

Refer to Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Dispensary Program Forms and Signage:

(2) The function, duties, and powers of the commission in sections 3 to 70 of this Act include the following:

(g) To regulate and prohibit any advertising by manufacturers, processors, wholesalers or retailers of marijuana items by the medium of newspapers, letters, billboards, radio or otherwise.

Q. What signage must dispensaries display at their sites?

NOTE: All required signage is available on the Forms and Signage page.

Entry Signage

A registered dispensary must post the applicable entry sign on the exterior of the dispensary in a conspicuous location that can be easily seen by the public from outside the dispensary at any point of public entry, in bold, 80 point Times New Roman font.

  • If a dispensary is only transferring marijuana and immature plants to OMMP patients and caregivers, the dispensary must post a sign that reads: “Medical Marijuana Patients Only.”
  • If a dispensary has properly notified the Authority that it intends to sell limited marijuana retail products, the dispensary must post signs that read: “Medical Marijuana Patients and Persons 21 and Older Permitted” and “NO PERSON UNDER 21 PERMITTED ON THE PREMISES WITHOUT AN OMMP CARD.”

Point of Sale Signage

A registered dispensary that has notified the Oregon Health Authority that it is conducting retail sales must also post the following signs at the point of sale:

  • Pregnancy Warning Poster
  • Poisoning Prevention Poster
  • A color copy of the “Educate Before You Recreate” poster (Source:whatslegaloregon.com).

Marijuana Information Card

Distribute to each individual at the time of sale a Marijuana Information Card, prescribed by the Authority, measuring 3.5 inches high by 5 inches.

 

Rhode Island

There are currently no advertising regulations for medical marijuana dispensaries in Rhode Island. For more information, please refer to the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act.

 

Texas

The advertising regulations for Texas’ CBD distribution centers is to be determined. For more information, please refer to the Texas Compassionate-Use Act.

 

Vermont

There are currently no advertising regulations for dispensaries in Vermont. For more information, please refer to the Vermont Marijuana Registry.

 

Washington

Refer to the Washington State Legislature section on cannabis advertising:

WAC 314-55-155

Advertising.

(1) Advertising by retail licensees. The board limits each retail licensed premises to one sign identifying the retail outlet by the licensee’s business name or trade name that is affixed or hanging in the windows or on the outside of the premises that is visible to the general public from the public right of way. The size of the sign is limited to sixteen hundred square inches.

(2) General. All marijuana advertising and labels of useable marijuana and marijuana-infused products sold in the state of Washington may not contain any statement, or illustration that:

(a) Is false or misleading;

(b) Promotes over consumption;

(c) Represents the use of marijuana has curative or therapeutic effects;

(d) Depicts a child or other person under legal age to consume marijuana, or includes:

(i) Objects, such as toys, characters, or cartoon characters suggesting the presence of a child, or any other depiction designed in any manner to be especially appealing to children or other persons under legal age to consume marijuana; or

(ii) Is designed in any manner that would be especially appealing to children or other persons under twenty-one years of age.

(3) No licensed marijuana producer, processor, or retailer shall place or maintain, or cause to be placed or maintained, an advertisement of marijuana, usable marijuana, or a marijuana-infused product in any form or through any medium whatsoever:

(a) Within one thousand feet of the perimeter of a school grounds, playground, recreation center or facility, child care center, public park, library, or a game arcade admission to which it is not restricted to persons aged twenty-one years or older;

(b) On or in a public transit vehicle or public transit shelter; or

(c) On or in a publicly owned or operated property.

(4) Giveaways, coupons, and distribution of branded merchandise are banned.

(5) All advertising must contain the following warnings:

(a) “This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming.”;

(b) “Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.”;

(c) “There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product.”; and

(d) “For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.”

 

Source: Leafly

 

 

Amplio alcance del turismo de marihuana en Estados Unidos

Colorado cannabis Tours llena rutinariamente sus autobuses. Los pasajeros pueden elegir una clase de cocina, una demostración de soplado de vidrio, o una visita a un centro de cultivo.

Los asientos llenos, el pequeño autobús turístico circula por las concurridas calles de Denver, exponiendo a sus pasajeros una demostración de soplado de vidrio. O también pueden elegir una clase de pintura, clase de cocina o visitar una granja de cultivo

Este autobús es una fiesta llena de humo y de gente feliz, huele a una residencia de estudiantes de arte. El soplador de vidrio tatuado elabora bongs y pipas de alto precio. La clase de cocina es para gourmets que quieren dar sabor a su cocina con marihuana. La creatividad de los pintores se agudiza por el cannabis. Y la granja de cultivo es de 40 000 pies cuadrados con una gran”facilidad de cultivo” y de uno de los principales productores de cannabis de Colorado.

Es la siguiente fase incipiente del cannabis legalizado: el turismo de marihuana. Y está alcanzando nuevos máximos en Colorado, en el Estado de Washington y en el de Oregon, con viajeros procedentes de estados que se frustrado la legalización y de otros por la lentitud con la que el movimiento de la legalización de la marihuana trabaja.

“Es una locura cómo muchas personas vienen aquí para esto”, dijo Heidi Keyes, un artista que dirige el Puff, Pass, y la clase de pintura para Colorado cannabis Tours, y que ahora se está expandiendo en Washington y Oregón.

La versión a la gira de degustación de vinos del siglo XXI, el turismo de marihuana proporciona una forma para que los empresarios capitalicen la marihuana legalizada sin la molestia de las regulaciones que controlan el cultivo y la venta de la misma directamente (y no por casualidad, llegan realmente nombres ingeniosos para los negocios).

Eso incluye el transporte (el Cannabus, Seattle; Mary Jane Tours, Telluride), alojamiento (the Bud and Breakfast; the Wake & Bakery Inn, both in Denver), guías personales (Colorado Cannabis Concierge), y las ferias y festivales (la Copa Cannabis , Portland, Ore., y en otros lugares).  Ski Buds Shuttle Service  amenizará su paseo a las pistas en Vail, incluyen recogida en el aeropuerto que le llevará desde su vuelo a Denver a una tienda de marihuana al por menor antes de que esté incluso vaya a su hotel. También hay planes en Colorado para un estilo de bodega “weederies” con tiendas de regalos y restaurantes, y un complejo de estilo de campamento de cannabis programado para abrir el próximo año.

“Para alguien que, digamos, veinteañero que disfruta del cannabis, la idea de que puede ir a un lugar donde puedan consumir legalmente y no verse tratado como un criminal por hacer algo que es demostrablemente menos peligroso que el consumo de alcohol, es atractivo “, dijo Kris Krane, un defensor de la legalización y socio gerente con sede en Boston de 4Front Advisors, una empresa de consultoría que trabaja con las empresas relacionadas con la marihuana.

La venta de la marihuana con fines recreativos es ahora legal en Colorado, Washington y Oregón, y está previsto que comience en el 2016 en Alaska. (Un referéndum para legalizar el uso recreativo y venta de marihuana será en Massachusetts en el 2016, y los posibles beneficios del turismo son algunos de los argumentos de los partidarios que están a favor de ella.)

cannabusUnos $ 700 millones en marihuana se vendieron en Colorado el año pasado, y Oregon predice sobre $ 257 millones en ventas este año. Los defensores dicen que el turismo de marihuana ayudó a elaborar el récord de 15,4 millones de visitantes y $ 4.6 mil millones en Denver solo el año pasado.

“Estas son las nuevas Ámsterdam del mundo”, dijo Eli Bilton, propietario de Attis Trading Co., un dispensario de marihuana en Portland, que también está empezando una empresa turística y busca lugares para abrir una “420-Este bed-and-breakfast” . Y mientras que el negocio apenas está comenzando allí, la marihuana recreativa se hizo legal en Oregon el 01 de octubre – “Ya estamos viendo un montón de forasteros”, dijo Bilton.

Las restricciones tales como la prohibición en Colorado en publicidad interestatal son entre muchos obstáculos enfrentados para esta industria naciente. ¿Otro? Las leyes, la que dicen que mientras que los visitantes pueden comprar las marihuana, no pueden fumar en sus hoteles.

Fiel a su estilo, astutos han descubierto maneras de evitar la norma: Encuentran alojamiento en 420-amigables en Airbnb o a través de empresas como Colorado cannabis Tours, que Keyes dijo haber reservado 1.700 habitaciones en hoteles amistosos con el cannabis solo entre julio y septiembre.

La gente que viene desafiando los estereotipos, dijeron los operadores de viaje. “Es por todo el lugar”, dijo Keyes. “Los profesionales de negocios, parejas de 35 a 55 años. Tuvimos una chica de 20 años que vino con sus abuelos, que eran de 80 años.”

El noventa por ciento de los pasajeros en el Cannabus de Seattle son de fuera del estado, dijo el director de marketing deNate Johnson“Tenemos un montón de gente de Boston y Nueva York.” Y mientras que los funcionarios debaten si se debe permitir cafeterías o salones del estilo Ámsterdam, donde la gente sería capaz de fumar libremente, el Cannabus transporta a sus pasajeros a un cultivo y a continuación a un dispensario de venta donde se pueden degustar diferentes cepas y comestibles, y luego a un “punto de visión” que domina la ciudad, donde se puede disfrutar de lo que Johnson llama “el punto más alto.” Luego los lleva a un restaurante.

“Mucha gente no quiere el dolor de cabeza de tomar un taxi y no saber a dónde ir”, dijo Johnson.”Tomamos el dolor de eso, y te llevamos a algún lugar si tienes el deseo de picar.”
Eso aún es mejor que una ruta del vino, dijo Keyes, quien realizó una gira de vino una vez en la que recuerda a alguien vomitando en el autobús. “Eso no ocurre con la marihuana. La gente está en calma, se están riendo, están teniendo un buen momento “.

descarga (13)Boosters dice que el turismo de la marihuana está ayudando por el hecho de que la mayoría de los lugares en los que la marihuana es legal también tienen otra empates – senderismo y esquí en Colorado, la pesca en Washington y Oregon.

“Las personas atraídas por actividades al aire libre tienden a ser un poco más atraídas por cannabis en general”, dijo Krane. “Si el cannabis se legaliza de repente en el centro de Siberia, es probable que se vea un gran repunte en el turismo.” Estados incluyendo Colorado se jactan de tener “un montón de actividades hermosas que realizar: la montaña, la nieve, el senderismo, el centro de Denver, y ahora se agrega a esto la oportunidad de probar todo este nuevo entorno de la marihuana recreativa “, dijo Chris Carroll, co-propietario de de Denver 2 Chicas Tours, que también ofrece tours de marihuana y cuya Wake and Bakery Inn está programado para abrir en abril .

Los defensores dicen que también hay algo de aventura al visitar los turistas las operaciones de cultivo una vez que sólo lo han visto en las noticias y en las películas de narcos.

“La gente que va a una bodega quieren ver cómo se hace el vino y los que vienen quiere conocer la forma natural del cannabis también “, dijo Krane. “A esto se añade el hecho de que esta es una industria que ha sido ilegal durante tanto tiempo, que ha estado en las sombras y en espacios de almacenes y garajes ocultos. Esto no es algo donde a la gente se le ha invitado para ver el proceso. Y ahora tienen la oportunidad de verlo de una manera que era completamente imposible de ver hasta ahora “.